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Nutrition is the cornerstone of good mental health.  This is why it’s one of the first things I talk with my clients about when they start to work with me.  Nobody is perfect, least of all me, but the more conscious we are about making sure to eat at least three meals a day, plus a few healthy snacks, the easier it will be for our mood to be calm and comfortable and out energy level to be active.

It’s not unusual, when I start to discuss this with my clients, for folks to tell me, “Well, I’m really not hungry in the morning.”  Because breakfast so strongly sets the tone for our bodies for the rest of the day (because of chemical processes that need to be fueled in the morning, as well as other things), this is an issue that we need to tackle together.

In her article, Dr. Allott teaches us about why you actually aren’t feeling hunger, even though your body really does need more food.  And, while she explains it in the context of breakfast, this is true for any time that our glucose level (“blood sugar”) goes low and kicks off a process in our liver that taps into our body’s emergency reserves.

PS – While you are on her site, you may want to explore.  She has TONS of free resources available that really help to illustrate the connection between nutrition and mood.

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